Chiefs Offensive Line #1 - The Best in the Business

Angel

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2006
Messages
2,264
Reaction score
1
Chiefs Offensive Line #1 - The Best in the Business
Jul 10, 2006, 8:39:28 AM by Bob Gretz


It was during a television timeout two years ago in Oakland that Brian Waters had what he calls “an epiphany.”



“It was late in the game and we were trying to win the thing and there was a timeout and I remember just stopping and looking at all the fans who were screaming at us and then just looking around the huddle at the guys that were there with me.

“I mean you look next to you and there stands Willie Roaf, a sure Hall of Famer. Then you turn to look the other way and there’s Casey Wiegmann the toughest guy on the field, and on the other side of him is Will Shields, another sure Hall of Famer.

“I remember just getting this feeling of ‘Man, I’m so lucky to be here playing with these guys.’ They are going to go down as some of the best in the history of football.”

There is no question that in the 21st Century of NFL football, none of the 32 franchises has been blessed with an offensive line that matches that of the Kansas City Chiefs.

Since Roaf arrived via a trade with the New Orleans Saints in 2002, they have been the engine that’s allowed the team’s offense to set franchise and league records on a regular basis. The quarterback, receivers and runners have all cracked the record books and they’ve all done it behind Roaf-Waters-Wiegmann-Shields.

Over the last four years, no team in the league can match the Chiefs 10 Pro Bowl slots claimed by Roaf (4), Waters (2) and Shields (4.)

“I appreciate them every single day that I’m with them,” said Trent Green. “When you’ve done the things that Willie Roaf and Will Shields have done, you don’t do it without a great deal of pride in your work.

“They come to work every day to uphold the standards that they’ve set and that pulls along all the other guys, not just the other linemen, but the rest of the offense. They’ve set the bar very high and we are all trying to achieve that.

“Those guys don’t have any other standard in the game today, other than to look in the mirror and say ‘This is what I’ve got to live up to.’ They try to do that on a daily basis.”

Until Roaf battled a hamstring problem last season this group of four had been together for every game since the 2002 season. Various right tackles had joined the party, from John Tait, to Jordan Black, to John Welbourn, to Kevin Sampson. But those four were the glue:

Shields has started 207 consecutive games and has played in 208 consecutive games; he’s never missed a game because of injury in 13 seasons.
Wiegmann has started 79 consecutive games at center and has missed just one in his five years with the team, that the season opener in 2001 when he could not play because of an appendectomy.
Waters has started 71 consecutive games at left guard and has not missed a game in five consecutive seasons.
Roaf has started 58 of 64 games since coming to the team, missing only six last year with the hamstring injuries.
“We look at it as we have to be there for each other,” said Shields. “We are important to each other. We like when we are all in the huddle. We don’t like it when other guys have to come in the huddle.

“That may seem a little selfish, but once you’ve been there and you’ve seen a guy fight with you, you always want that guy on your wing.”

Here’s what they and head coach Herm Edwards had to say about the Big Four:

Roaf: “If you’ve ever seen him walk and then seen him play, you wouldn’t imagine it was the same person,” said Shields. “His pass protections skills are very good and he’s very explosive off the ball. There are not many guys that can do what he does on the edge.” Said Wiegmann: “I would say he’s the best tackle in NFL football history. The guy can barely walk off the field and he turns into a super-blocking freak on the field. You look at his body and he’s got small legs, but they are so explosive. He just mauls people. He gets on them and he’s non-stop, in a guy’s face.” Said Waters: “He’s talented, long-armed, experienced and a heck of an athlete. He has to be to play with that body.”

Waters: “The way he can abuse a defensive tackle is unbelievable,” said Wiegmann. “He can toss a guy that weighs 330 pounds to the ground in a split second. On top of that, he has great athletic ability. He can run. Brian has put it all together with his strength, his smarts and his athletic skills.” Said Shields: “He’s so strong and he’s so good using his hands that he can muscle people anywhere he wants them to go. Plus, he plays with a little anger and that’s what you want from a guy, that he can play with a little anger.” Said Edwards: “He’s very smart, he’s very analytical; he likes to analyze things. And on top of that, he’s very, very, very tough.”

Shields: “He’s one of the smartest players I’ve ever played with and he might be the smartest player in the league,” said Wiegmann. “He knows the game of football inside and out. We sit in meetings and he’s always drawing up plays, writing stuff down, just thinking of stuff that we can do different. Minor details are big to him. He’s always working on something in practice. He never wastes a minute.” Said Waters: “His technique is out of this world. He’s the most consistent player on the field play-after-play, game-after-game.” Said Edwards: “He’s Clark Kent. He’s a mild-mannered guy who quietly walks around here wearing his glasses and most people wouldn’t know who he is. Then he puts that No. 68 on, and now he’s got a lot of nasty in him. He’s a great technician, great fundamentals, but he’s also a tough guy. He’s a great pro.”

Wiegmann: “He’s a great finesse player,” said Shields. “He will give and take things away from a defensive player as the game goes on and he tries to manipulate them. He’s really good, maybe the best in the game, when he’s in space and head up with a linebacker. He gives up so much size to some of the guys in the league, but it’s amazing how he uses his leverage.” Said Edwards: “He’s the unsung hero. When I took the job, he was one of the first players I called in and I told him, ‘I appreciate what you do and what you stand for. I know you don’t get your due credit because there are such great offensive linemen on this team, but from a coach’s standpoint, I understand how important you are to this line.” Said Waters: “He’s tough, as tough as nails. He’s so smart and he’s surprisingly athletic.”

Roaf and Shields are back for another season, after both pondered whether a 14th season in the NFL was in the physical cards.

“I’m already talking to those guys, whispering in their ears about next year (2007),” said Trent Green with a laugh.

This coming season is the only thing on the offensive line’s radar screen right now. They will try to continue their excellence together, continue an unspoken quest to put their names with the best offensive line groups of all time.

“I would say we are close, but we are not among the best,” said Shields.

Said Waters: “We should be in the discussion, just because of Willie and Will. How many lines have had two guys that should be in the Hall of Fame? There aren’t any better groups right now. But in football history? That would be saying a lot.”

Coming Wednesday: The best offensive lines in pro football over the last 35 years.

The opinions offered in this column do not necessarily reflect those of the Kansas City Chiefs.

http://www.kcchiefs.com/news/2006/07/10/gretz_chiefs_offensive_line_1__the_best_in_the_business/
 
The productivity of Priest Holmes and now Larry Johnson speak volumes. Especially considering the fact that KC's WR corps has been merely average for years. Opponents KNOW that KC is going to run the rock and still can't stop them.

I wish we could exchange the guys in Red & Yellow for the guys in Silver & Black, that's for damn sure.
 
Not me. Definitely not me. No way, no-how. Maybe a couple years ago, but not today baby. Those old farts are coming to the end of their useful football lives. I wouldn't give all the tea in Britain for K.C.'s OL today.

I like our kids, despite all their undelivered promise. I think Big Art gets the most out of them and sets us up for a couple years of Pro Bowl calibre play.
 
Rupert said:
Not me. Definitely not me. No way, no-how. Maybe a couple years ago, but not today baby. Those old farts are coming to the end of their useful football lives. I wouldn't give all the tea in Britain for K.C.'s OL today.

I like our kids, despite all their undelivered promise. I think Big Art gets the most out of them and sets us up for a couple years of Pro Bowl calibre play.

Well yeah. I should have clarified my position better. Over the past 15 years or so, the Chefs have put together a consistently excellent offensive line.
 
RaiderIVlife said:
Well yeah. I should have clarified my position better. Over the past 15 years or so, the Chefs have put together a consistently excellent offensive line.
Not really...in the 90's the Chiefs had a much better defense than an offense....The Chiefs defense started sliding downhill when Derrick Thomas died...and just kept on going straight to Hell from there....The offense was just average for the most part...When they did get a good offense, then the defense couldn't hold up their side of a game...that's always been the Chiefs biggest problem IMO...maintaining a good balance on both sides of the ball.
 
Ah let's face it...the Chiefs are the Raiders' bitches. :p
 
CrossBones said:
Ah let's face it...the Chiefs are the Raiders' bitches. :p
Not hardly Bones...you wanna fight? ;)
 
Status
This thread has been closed due to inactivity. You can create a new thread to discuss this topic.
Back
Top