Offseason Suit Thread

Discussion in 'Raiders Discussion' started by Sleet, Feb 26, 2018.

  1. boknowsvt

    boknowsvt A Noble Spirit Embiggens The Smallest Man

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    I can weigh in on the teacher topic as I teach Kindergarten in Maryland. I’ve taught in Vermont, California, Florida, and Texas and all the experiences have been different. I loved Florida (weather and good friends) but the day my wife told me that she was pregnant I had to go to my principal and let him know that I had to start looking for jobs in other states because we couldn’t afford Florida on mine and my wife’s income. They fuck teachers hard in that state because it’s a giant retirement community. Voters don’t care about kids, they dealt with that shit when they were parents. I moved to Texas which sucked because it was Texas but they paid well and we were ok. We moved to Maryland to be close to family and I analyzed the numbers and decided we could build a life here, which we have been.
    I am perfectly happy with the amount of money that I make for the job that I do. I don’t follow the unions rules and will do extra if I’m asked. I get that some people don’t and it bugs be for sure. There are people who complain for the sake of complaining and make it out to be much more difficult than it truly is. Every job has hardships, we aren’t a special breed, and you won’t see me bitching on social media because I know that things could always be worse.
     
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  2. YodasBeast

    YodasBeast Green Power, Bitches!

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    Yes. It just won't go lower than that. Some of the early predictions stated it could get as low as $170MM.
     
  3. YodasBeast

    YodasBeast Green Power, Bitches!

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    Also, if the cap doesn't get higher than $180MM, then the Raiders have to clear $28MM, just to get started. The guys below would be the most likely cuts/trades.

    T Williams - 10.6
    T Brown - 14
    Incognito - 5.6
    Mariota - 11.3
    Carr - 19.6 (With Wentz going to the Colts, I don't see anyone else jumping for him now)
    G Jackson - 9.6
    Richard - 3.5
     
  4. Madturk

    Madturk Barry McCockinner

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    I read where Joyner would be a cap casualty as well if he doesn't restructure. No one paying him $10+mm
     
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  5. YodasBeast

    YodasBeast Green Power, Bitches!

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    Yeah, he'd be a savings of $8.7MM, with dead money of $2.5MM.
     
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  6. RF34

    RF34 Habitual Line Stepper

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    [​IMG]

    New normal: How the NFL’s strangest season may have changed it forever


    By Lindsay Jones Feb 17, 2021
    The NFL made it through its weirdest season ever, and crowned a new Super Bowl champion without needing an asterisk.

    But even though the pandemic season is over, the NFL may never return to normal. And that might not be a bad thing.

    “I don’t know when normal is going to occur again,” commissioner Roger Goodell said in a Super Bowl week news conference. “I know this – we have learned to operate in a very difficult environment, we have found solutions and will do it again.”

    From virtual meetings and streamlined scouting to more time at home for players and coaches with their families, the league found that in some ways, 2020 actually ran better than normal.

    As the business of the NFL offseason began Tuesday with five hours of virtual competition committee meetings, the leadership within the league office, all 32 teams and the players association starts with two questions: What worked, and what should we keep?

    “I think it would be a shame to then just revert back to what we’ve always done just because we’ve always done it that way,” NFL Players Association president and Cleveland Browns center J.C. Tretter said.

    Indeed, one of the top items on the competition committee agenda Tuesday was “COVID protocol carryovers,” according to a document obtained by The Athletic.

    So, what might be here to stay?

    Offseason and training camp structure
    For players and coaches, the most drastic change to last season was the complete elimination of the in-person offseason program. All of those voluntary workouts in April and May? Mandatory minicamps in June? Preseason games? COVID-19 canceled all of them, and players, largely, loved it.

    There were legitimate concerns last summer about how the lack of on-field practice time throughout the offseason would impact the quality of play in the fall. Those fears proved to be unfounded. Scoring was up, rookies were not at a profound disadvantage (see: Justin Herbert or Justin Jefferson or Chase Young or Antoine Winfield Jr.) and free agents were able to succeed in new spots despite the lack of time to learn a new system (see: Tom Brady).

    “Virtual is going to be part of our life for the long term. I think we learned, and the coaches learned, the players learned, that it was actually a very positive way to install offenses and to work in the offseason, so I think we’ll see more of that for sure,” Goodell said.

    Tretter, elected by his peers to lead the players’ union last March, will push for the changes to the offseason program, including at-home strength and conditioning workouts and virtual meetings and film sessions, to become permanent.

    “Asking coaches whether you should take away practice is like asking the Cookie Monster if there should be less cookies. The answer is always going to be no, they want more,” Tretter said. “But in the end, it’s about building a better program. Building one that works for everybody involved and makes this game safer and our players healthier. We need to talk to the NFL about it and work through our experts. They should have a large voice in how this is built out. But in the end, it’s about making the best program for older guys, younger guys, wherever you stand in this league, making it the safest program.”

    Look for the union to make a player health and safety argument when it launches negotiations on what the 2021 offseason — and beyond — will look like.

    The union is still awaiting the full set of injury data from last season, but anecdotally, Tretter said he heard players finished feeling better physically and mentally because of the reduced practice time.

    “Change is always scary, but we’ve come out on the other side in a much better position. And now, it’s the point of getting down with the league, talking to them about which of these changes we should move forward, because they are better for everybody involved,” Tretter said. “The game’s growing and getting better, and we are healthier and can play longer and players can stay on the field. That is good for everybody involved.”

    In the short term, players and coaches should expect the spring to look similar in many ways to the last offseason, heavy on virtual meetings and light on in-person gatherings.

    A permanent change would have to be collectively bargained, but a league source told The Athletic there appears to be enough support from both sides for such a change to be possible.

    Two things that will likely return, in some fashion? A traditional training camp and preseason games. Owners reluctantly agreed to cancel exhibitions in 2020, as one of the final bargaining points with the union in July, but teams and the league want those games to return.

    Both sides already agreed to fewer preseason games as part of the collective bargaining agreement signed last March — the slate will be reduced to two or three games when the 17-game regular-season schedule is implemented, perhaps as early as 2021 — and owners will not willingly give up that revenue stream again.

    Coaches, general managers and even some players (and their agents) will vouch for the importance of those preseason games for preparation for the regular season and for the development of younger players who need live reps.

    “I also believe and our coaches feel strongly, and we’ll talk about this with the union, that there’s value in the training camp, there’s value in practices,” Goodell said. “There’s value in having preseason games where you can develop young players and give them the opportunity to get better as football players. The veterans may not need that as much. So those are the types of things that I think we’ll balance as we come into the offseason and I’m sure we’ll come up with solutions for that.”

    Roster rules
    In preparation for COVID-19-related roster disruptions in 2020, the NFL made significant changes to give teams more flexibility. That included expanding practice squads (from 10 players in 2019 to 16 last season) and changing who was allowed on those practice squads (up to six of the players were allowed to have more than two years’ experience). The league also eased restrictions on how quickly players could return from injured reserve, reducing the minimum from six weeks to three, with no limit on how many players could return.

    “All of those things will definitely be reviewed and discussed,” said Dawn Aponte, the NFL’s chief football administrative officer.

    And when the NFL’s competition committee seeks feedback during its offseason meetings, expect many of those changes to receive overwhelmingly positive reviews from coaches and general managers, a league source said. The changes to injured reserve were especially popular, and the ability to bring back additional players did not appear to impact competitive balance.

    “Why would you go back, when there were so many positives for so many people?” the league source said.

    Other changes that could remain include the reduction of the number of people allowed in the team’s bench area during games and road-game travel protocols, Aponte said.

    Recent officiating changes, like creating crews based on their geography and assigning games on a regional basis to reduce the amount of travel, may also become permanent. So could the elimination of the sideline booth for the referee to view replays.

    Scouting process and the draft
    The 2021 draft process will be impacted more by COVID-19 than last year, when the NFL was able to get in the annual scouting combine and a handful of pro days before the pandemic shut the league down in mid-March.

    The 2021 combine has already been canceled, replaced by pro day-only evaluations for most prospects and virtual visits with team personnel. This comes after a college football season in which scouts were prohibited from conducting their typical on-campus visits to watch practices and games and to speak with college personnel about draft-eligible prospects.

    NFL teams and the league will push for many of those aspects to return when it is safe. Still, other elements of the traditional scouting process may not, because of what teams and scouts have learned they can accomplish virtually. Interviews can be done over Zoom, practices and games can easily be recorded and health records can be shared online.

    That could mean less time on the road for area scouts in the fall, when they would typically be driving from college town to college town, as well as in the spring, when scouts typically gather together at team facilities for draft meetings. Last spring showed those meetings could be held virtually without much of a negative impact.

    The NFL has not yet announced specifics of public events for the 2021 draft, scheduled for April 29-May 1 in Cleveland. Recent events like Super Bowl LV indicate that public events could be scaled back, with increased health and screening protocols in place.

    NFL executives and coaches should be allowed to conduct the 2021 draft from team facilities, but they should expect to have fewer people in the building and inside the draft room than in past years. They should also expect the videoconferencing aspects implemented in 2020 to continue. Last year’s draft showed that teams could successfully and securely submit their draft picks online, replacing the archaic — and time-consuming — tradition of calling the pick in to a landline telephone.

    The virtual aspect of the draft will likely remain for many of the prospects, a league source said. One of the most popular parts of the 2020 draft was the ability to peek inside the homes and small draft parties of prospects. It worked, and will be easy to replicate and expand.
     
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  7. gst8

    gst8 Well-Known Member

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    "There were legitimate concerns last summer about how the lack of on-field practice time throughout the offseason would impact the quality of play in the fall. Those fears proved to be unfounded. Scoring was up, rookies were not at a profound disadvantage (see: Justin Herbert or Justin Jefferson or Chase Young or Antoine Winfield Jr.) and free agents were able to succeed in new spots despite the lack of time to learn a new system (see: Tom Brady)."

    Someone telefax this to Gruden stat.
     
  8. Sleet

    Sleet #2018: Return of Gru

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    Lol

    It’s all relative:
    1. Was scoring up b/c (a) greater offseason turnover on D, (b) it is easier to exploit a D that has less practice time than an O with less practice time, and/or (c) Refs swallowed their whistles for a large part of the season (until the Raiders were threatening to make the playoffs)?

    2. What does “profound” disadvantage mean? Is that an admission that the four cited exceptions proved the rule? That less offseason hurt rookies more than veterans, but not “profoundly”? :rolleyes:

    3. What does the GOAT’s success have anything to do with the rank and file? If all FA were the GOAT, I guess, we would not need any offseason?
    Perhaps there is some merit to this, but that was too easy. :pound:
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2021
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  9. gst8

    gst8 Well-Known Member

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    Relative. Sure. Relative to whether we're making excuses for the Raiders lol.
     
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  10. Winston Smith

    Winston Smith Living in 1984

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    It was something the whole league had to deal with, not just the Raiders. It is just another excuse from a guy who has a Rolodex full of them...and yes, I am certain Gruden still has a Rolodex on his desk.
     
  11. Sleet

    Sleet #2018: Return of Gru

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    The excuse card is tired on both sides, not just on the coach answering why but the person labeling why an “excuse.” Unless a coach is only going to talk about winning, what do you expect the coach to say? We executed badly. I coached poorly. We missed on a few too many picks. On to next. End of presser. Lol
     
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  12. gst8

    gst8 Well-Known Member

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    I just want to see some of the old DGAF Chuckie show up once in while instead of this housebroke neutered dough boy version.

    Get mad and cut a mofo. Fire a fucking coach timely. Something other than this sad "woe is us" crap.
     
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  13. Sleet

    Sleet #2018: Return of Gru

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    :beerbang:
     
  14. Winston Smith

    Winston Smith Living in 1984

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    Yes. It is called taking accountability.
     
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  15. 007

    007 Commitment To Excrement

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    David Dunn.

    Fumbled on a Monday Nighter and was delivering pizzas by Wednesday.

    This Gruden is all nostalgia and pleasant memories. He aint the guy we all remember. Abram wouldnt have lasted 5 games for him in 1999.
     
  16. Sleet

    Sleet #2018: Return of Gru

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    But most do, including Jon. Every presser. Then they keep talking.
     
  17. Sleet

    Sleet #2018: Return of Gru

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    All?

    Gruden’s got Carr playing better than predicted and many thought possible, got Waller to set a Raider season record after being on the street in 2017, got Agholor to have a career year after being the butt of jokes on nightly TV in Philly, and did that with backup OG and OT playing as much as starters, and Jacobs disappointing the 2nd half of the year. The Raiders’ offensive performances against KC and NO were a joy to watch.
     
  18. godeep811

    godeep811 University of Mars

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    Agreed. Gruden seems mellowed versus his first HC job. He has some of the fire, but not close to that intensity.
     
  19. godeep811

    godeep811 University of Mars

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    How hard is it to pick a name? We could do it here in a few minutes. I do like "Justice" but only if it was the "Justice League." :p

    The Washington Football Team will go by that name again in 2021.

    The team launched a website Tuesday that will chronicle the franchise's name change. On the front page of the site, it states "the future of Washington Football arrives in 2022."

    The website also includes a timeline that walks fans through the name-change process. It includes five chapters: Transformation, discovery, insight, creation and execution. Throughout the process, the team will take suggestions from fans. In the discovery chapter, it states those suggestions "will guide the creation of our new identity."

    There's an area on the website where fans can submit ideas for the next team name. Fans can write up their vision for the team, and even include images to uniform and logo designs they create. Anything submitted through this system will be owned by the team, so it's possible the organization could choose a fan submission for its next name and design.

    For now, the team is displaying submitted ideas on its website. Fan-submitted names currently include the Washington Memorials, Washington Rhinos, and Washington Justice. Some of those, like the Justice, include pictures featuring new uniform and logo designs.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. TheNextStep

    TheNextStep TX BBQ > KC BBQ

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    There is no such thing as Washington Justice. Everyone agrees on that.
     
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